How good is your ‘Talk’??

Communicating well doesn’t come naturally for all of us.

What was that awesome line from the new Game of Thrones…??

“There’s no story so good that a drink won’t make better”.

No matter how good you are at communicating, you can always get better…

It’s like the Law of Generals that says, “He with the best map wins”;

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When you’re communicating, if your ‘big picture’ is more expansive and more detailed than your audience’s own big picture, then you will tend to become the one that steers the conversation.

So if you’ve got a message that you want to deliver, and you want to make sure it gets through… get an upgrade on your map of the territory you’re playing in:

Massively expand your big picture by reaching to the farthest edge of your knowledge base and bring what you see back into perspective.

The actualisation of your goals requires that you can share your core concepts effectively.

That first point of contact with whom you’re communicating with is a special moment where your two worlds collide. The initial period of communication is usually made up of a series of culturally normal expressions, that provide space for you ‘to suss each other out’.

This is the point at which you are looking to see what territory you have in common, in each others maps. ‘How much do we share?’ is the question at this point.

Now, it’s true… compassion is the most direct way to achieve rapport. It can serve also to be strategic.

Expand your map now, and see how much familiar ground we really share.

-.-

Derren Brown recommends this guy, Ian Rowland. Scroll down on his home page for the free gift. Or if you’re really serious about seeing how far you can reach, and you want to take your communication abilities to the next level, check out his comprehensive psychology textbook.

Best Map Wins

-.-

P.S. As always, this information is provided for educational purposes and we recommend you apply it keenly and wisely and with great compassion. Any militaristic metaphors are used in the sense of the japanese philosopher strategists who eventually just wanted to tend their gardens.

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